The Ministry of a Smile

I thought that this kid was just overly excited to meet “the Americans” but as I observed him throughout the three hours we spent together, I realized that Eric just loves to smile. His smile was infectious and I knew that by the end of the day, I would want to bottle it up, put it in my backpack, and carry it with me wherever I went.

Duke Divinity Interns Join Umoja Project

This May we welcome Kadeisha Kilgore and Elizabeth (Liz) Styron, two Duke Divinity School students who will be working with the Umoja Project in Chulaimbo this summer. They will be supporting the Umoja Project staff by visiting schools, monitoring students and planning activities, such as the annual GET UP retreat for teenaged girls.   Global…

Indiana youth leader wins United Way award.

Sophomore Jamie Goetz has been selected as one of United Way’s LIVE UNITED Volunteers of the Year for her leadership of theCarmel High School Kenya Club, her participation on GIP’s Youth Leadership Team, and her contributions to the annual Kenya Carnival. Jamie was the first and only student recognized with the Volunteer of the Year…

Kenya Carnival was a great day of fun and fundraising.

Face painting, Silly Safari, inflatable games… There was something for everyone at the 8th annual Kenya Carnival. We thank each of the 175 volunteers — representing 15 congregations, schools, and community groups — who worked together to make the day such a success.  Through their efforts, and your ongoing financial support, we met our goal…

Dust

If there is one thing I miss most about Kenya, it’s the dust…
the orange brown particles still embedded in my chacos that once coated my feet, turned my boogers orange, and made it appear like I’d spent all day in a tanning bed.

The challenge of creating a sustainable school lunch program

Without question, providing a school lunch to a Kenyan student is one of the most cost-effective ways to keep the young boys and girls served by the Global Interfaith Partnership doing well in school. For only $25 per school year, we are able to provide a nutritious noon meal for a student who otherwise might not eat much all day. Children’s health improves; their school attendance improves; their academic performance improves. Teachers tell us that students who used to struggle to come to school each day are now attending regularly and performing at the top of their class.

Walking Each Other Home

It has occurred to me that the Umoja Project is about friendship. If you had a friend in need, you would not march into his or her home with a list of objectives and start moving things, installing things, “improving” things. You would sit with your friend and say, “Tell me what’s going on.” and “I’m here for you.” Then you might ask, “How can I help?”